gooollysandra

Thoughts on thoughts and images of beautiful things

Monthly Archives: June 2019

Museums of everyday life

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The Museum of Everyday Life in Glover, VT exhibits random objects that most would probably consider junk, especially in our disposable throw-away society. But I think the argument that these objects actually hold value and are worth keeping, maybe not in your own home, but somewhere for people to look at and remember, is worth considering. And that it was recently featured in the New York Times is certainly a testament to that. The museum, which is an unassuming barn, displays matches, which was the first exhibition, locks and keys, scissors, toothbrushes, etc. Some objects from special exhibitions then make it into the permanent collection. These objects may seem completely mundane, but they are important in their banality because they are things that we use everyday and are all around us. The museum is free and open to the public, although donations are always appreciated. It truly is a public space, as there is no one there attending to it and visitors can just come and go.

I lived in New England for one year and I absolutely loved it. Somehow a free little barn museum full of mundane, thrown-away objects is something I can totally picture in New England! 🙂

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It turns out this isn’t the only museum of everyday objects. They are around the world, including Hversdagssafn in Iceland. Their focus seems to be not only on mundane objects of everyday life, but also feelings, experiences, memories of everyday life, and “finding the poetry that comes forward when no one is looking.” As the women behind the museum, Björg and Vaida, put it:

Everyday life is a little bit like dark matter. It is what happens in between significant moments in life and holds everything together. It is meeting friends, having dinner, yelling at children, being yelled at, sulking, laughing and so on. And so on. It is walking from one place to the next. It is going to work. It is staying at home. It is worrying and washing dishes. It is both random and routine.

All of these little everyday things that we do mindlessly are actually what make up our lives and build our story day after day. So not only should everyday objects be appreciated, but also routine actions and activities because they are what make up our lives on a very primary level, and then comes everything else.

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“Lived In”

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Architect duo (both personally and professionally) Zoe Chan Eayrs and Merlin Eayrs design homes from the inside out, literally and figuratively. They buy houses in the London area and live in them for a while as they design and renovate them, which means that they are authentically put together and decorated with pieces that are collected over time, rather than superficially staged with pieces for the sake of needing to find pieces to fill the space. Because they live in the houses while working on them, there is no client for whom they have to design for. They design for themselves, in a new way/style each time, therefore honing in on every detail over time. Although each project is unique, they do have a muted, subdued color palette that creates a sense of calm that’s like an ode to the present connected to an elusive past – a history embedded in it, yet created by the design in the present. The end result is a personal, unique labor of love that the client buys because he/she likes the house, not because the client hired them to design a house to his/her liking.

Their website features a portfolio of their work in both pictures and video form so that you get to experience the spaces and the details for yourself, and catch a glimpse of their creative output. You can also learn about their design process, the materials they used, where they found their inspiration for each project, obstacles they encountered along the way, etc. My favorite is The Herringbone House, which Zoe Chan Eayrs actually designed without Merlin Eayrs, as I’m partial to a lighter, airier feel. Although the New Cross Lofts, which they both designed, is a close second. So go take a tour!

Chicago’s residential architecture styles

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Chicago is the city of the three story walk-up apartment building. Or at least the Chicago I know. Sure, it is also home to the high-rise apartment building, but that is a world that I’m not quite accustomed to since, well, high-rises are generally at a different price point than walk-ups. The Chicago magazine recently did an article about the styles of residential architectural in Chicago by AJ LaTrace, illustrated by Phil Thomas of Cape Horn Illustration.

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I’m partial to bungalows, so I think that’s my favorite type of Chicago home. Apparently the bungalow is also symbolizes “a man with a more authentic connection to Chicago than the cosmopolitan High-Rise Man”. The article offers historical insights about each style, like the fact that there are about 80,000 bungalows in the city, the greystone is “Chicago’s response to the Brooklyn browstone”, worker’s cottages were quickly rebuilt after the great fire, and Mies van der Rohe’s influence on the modernist high-rise. And the illustrations are magnificent. If you like what you see, check out Phil Thomas’s website, where you can buy a print for yourself!